Cybercrime

Why is ransomware now life threatening?

COVID-19 wasn't the only deadly disease of 2020

Why is ransomware now life threatening?

COVID-19 wasn't the only deadly disease of 2020

Why is ransomware now life threatening?

COVID-19 wasn't the only deadly disease of 2020

When a patient died after a ransomware attack meant she had to be diverted from her nearest center for care, the cybersecurity world paid close attention. Why is this event being described as a warning for the future of cyber defense? Watch Ransomware: An Escalating Threat to find out.

Ransomware’s malicious history

In 1989, a Harvard Ph.D graduate sent 20,000 floppy disks to that year's international AIDS conference attendees, labeled AIDS Information – Introductory Diskettes. They were loaded with the earliest known ransomware, PS Cyborg. It encrypted files on the host's computer unless the owner sent $189 to PC Cyborg Cor. And it was no misguided academic experiment – the graduate just wanted extra cash.

Malwaer changes focus

Fast forward 31 years from ransomware's inception. Today, this form of malware is life threatening.

Historically, ransomware targeted personal computer users. Today, the profit's in attacking businesses, because they have more money and valuable data. By the end of 2021 there will be a ransomware attack every 11 seconds, causing overall damage worth 20 billion US dollars. But it's not just about money.

Tragic incident heralds a new age of secuity concern

The coronavirus pandemic was the opportunity of the decade for ransomware. While overrun healthcare systems experienced an unprecedented wave of attacks, one ransomware incident in Dusseldorf, Germany stood out.

Medics received a call from a woman in pain. When they saw her, they realized she needed urgent surgery. They planned to take her to the local university hospital, but a ransomware attack had shut down its crucial machinery, so she had to be diverted to another emergency unit. She died on route.

With the consequences of ransomware now proven deadly, how do we protect ourselves, our loved ones and our businesses? Prepare yourself with free ransom decryption tools from No More Ransom – an initiative by the Netherlands' police, Europol's European Cybercrime Centre, Kaspersky and McAfee.

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Down with Doxing: What to do to stop it

Your data matters - simple tips to keep it sage from a new wave of cybercriminial

Down with Doxing: What to do to stop it

Your data matters - simple tips to keep it sage from a new wave of cybercriminial

Down with Doxing: What to do to stop it

Your data matters - simple tips to keep it sage from a new wave of cybercriminial

Doxing. Have you heard of it? If not, here's why you might want to get up to date and some simple tips to keep protected. Essential personal data protection reading.

Open access to data - friend or foe?

The accessibility of information today is one of our most empowering freedoms. But it can also fuel malicious personal attacks, known as doxing or doxxing. We're about to take you through what doxing is, how criminals do it and how to prevent it.

What is doxing?

Doxing is maliciously revealing personal information online, for example, posting an anonymous blogger's real name or address. Doxers aim to punish, intimidate or humiliate their target by finding out sensitive information and using it against them, like selling your credit card details or threatening to burgle your home.

The never-ending black hole of personal information that is the internet means anyone with the time, motivation and interest can weaponize your personal data. And doxing is a growing problem.

How does doxing work?

These are the most common ways doxers grab data to expose someone.

Tracking usernames

When someone uses one username across multiple platforms, doxers can follow the trail.

Phishing

Phishing scams are fake emails luring victims to click through to a malicious site where attackers may steal sensitive information.

Stalking social media

Geotagging your photos? Sharing your work location? Doxers can use this to build up a picture of your life and even to deduce the answers to your account security questions.

Is doxing that bad?

Yes. Doxing can have catastrophic consequences.

In 2015, hackers forced entry to dating site for people in committed relationships, Ashley Madison, stealing 32 million users' data. They demanded payment to return the records but didn't get it, so published all the data online, causing professional and personal harm, and probably a divorce or two. And then in 2020 Ashley Madison's attackers came back for more.

Doxing knows no bounds. There are no clear good or bad sides. After an anonymous UK-based security researcher saved the world from a powerful cyberattack, the media outed his real identity and address, leaving him open to a revenge attack from the cybercrime group he went out to stop. Marcus Hutchins' story is one of a kind.

Protect yourself from doxers with this checklist

Recent research shows more of our data is being sold to organizations and criminals. Cybercriminals could use almost all of it for doxing or cyberbullying.

Credit cards and banking log-ins are the most in-demand. They're used for extortion, phishing schemes and straight-up money theft. Meanwhile, doxxers use personal account access to cause reputational harm. How do you stop it happening to you? This anti-doxing checklist has everything you need to stay safe.

Keen to learn more about doxing and how to prevent it?

Kaspersky, in collaboration with endtab.org, has just released a free doxing training course. You'll learn about the dangers of dox attacks, how to protect against them and what to do if you're a victim.

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Five of the most insightful COVID-19 documentaries

Videos we like: Documentaries on how COVID-19 changed our world

Five of the most insightful COVID-19 documentaries

Videos we like: Documentaries on how COVID-19 changed our world

Five of the most insightful COVID-19 documentaries

Videos we like: Documentaries on how COVID-19 changed our world

How much will our lives change after COVID-19? We look at five of the most powerful documentaries made during the pandemic.

How did filmmakers see COVID-19?

The global community meets an invisible enemy, and must race against the clock to save humanity – COVID-19 is a compelling story. How was it seen by filmmakers around the world? These five must-see documentaries from creatives worldwide exploring different sides of the pandemic.

76 Days (above)

Directed by Hao Wu and Weixi Chen

China

What was Wuhan like in the pandemic's early days? Wonder no more. This acclaimed documentary is a poignant snapshot of struggle and resilience in the battle to survive the coronavirus.

Watch the full 76 Days documentary

hacker:HUNTER Ha(ck)c1ne

Directed by Didi Mae Hand

UK/Switzerland

The pandemic stretched hospital resources more than ever. Among the first to take advantage of the struggle was a wave of deadly hackers. Follow as the healthcare system fights the virus on two fronts.

Part of a series commissioned by Tomorrow Unlocked.

Coronation

Coronation from Ai Weiwei Films on Vimeo.

Directed by Ai WeiWei

China

Each country responded differently to the outbreak. China's was one of military and extreme efficiency. But what impact did that response have on their people? Behind the scenes of China's battle against a silent killer, directed by acclaimed artist Ai WeiWei.

Eight countries, one global pandemic

Directed by Great Big Story

USA

This heartwarming documentary follows eight households from across the globe every day through the pandemic, to see how different families coped with lockdown.

The Curve

THE CURVE | Full Movie | COVID-19 Documentary Thriller from Oscar®-Nominee Adam Benzine from Jet Black Iris on Vimeo.

Directed by Adam Benzine

USA

The Trump administration's response to COVID-19 receives an insightful, highly emotional look from Academy Award-nominated director Adam Benzine.

It wasn't just professionals capturing the pandemic through a lens. During lockdown, we asked creatives worldwide to capture one hour from their pandemic experience. Watch the playlist we made from these moments – TWELVE.

What have we missed? Share your pick of COVID-19 documentaries with us on Facebook and Twitter, or let us know which of these you found most insightful.

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Unravelling the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympic cyberattack mystery

Unravelling the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympic cyberattack mystery

Is the Olympics hacker heaven? Tech highs and lows

Our video picks: Olympic Games – tech success or failure?

As the Olympic torch begins its journey to Tokyo 2021's opening ceremony, we ask, is the Olympic Games a chance for technology to shine or a data breach waiting to happen?

Tech successes and failures at the Olympic Games

In ancient Greece, the Olympics began some 3,000 years ago as a sporting event to honour the god Zeus. As the iconic torch sets off on its journey to the Tokyo 2021 opening ceremony, we ask if the Olympic Games is where new technological standards are set, or a breeding ground for emerging cyber threats.

Tech successes and failures from Olympic history range from robotics to autonomous vehicles, to merciless malware that tried to start a cyberwar.

Highlight: Did this drone display steal the show?

Good Morning America shows us how new drones from Intel will change medal ceremonies forever.

Highlight: Tokyo’s high-tech plan for 2020 Olympics

With the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games just around the corner, here's a snapshot of the incredible technology the organizers will use to make the event smoother and more enjoyable for everyone.

Lowlight: One of the most deceptive hacks in cyber history?

If successful, the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics' cyberattack would have left a geopolitical disaster in its wake. hacker: Hunter Olympic Destroyer is a three-part series exploring the mysterious motives behind the attackers, why it's one of the most deceptive cyberattacks in history and the 'extraordinarily brilliant' response that stopped it in its tracks. Watch the full 2018 Olympic cyberattack series.

The Olympic Games is one of the biggest stages on Earth to champion technology in all forms. But with more than sports at stake if things go wrong – think, mountains of personal data and even competitors' health – how can businesses and organizations make sure this event and its tech is safe for all to enjoy?

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The email worm of mass destruction

We Like: NationSquids' demo of the 'I Love You Virus'

The email worm of mass destruction

We Like: NationSquids' demo of the 'I Love You Virus'

The email worm of mass destruction

We Like: NationSquids' demo of the 'I Love You Virus'

Check out SecureList for a lot more information about malware and cybersecurity.

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Want a career in cyber? Meet the women owning it

These are cybersecurity's trailblazing women to follow

Want a career in cyber? Meet the women owning it

These are cybersecurity's trailblazing women to follow

Want a career in cyber? Meet the women owning it

These are cybersecurity's trailblazing women to follow

This International Women's Day, we celebrate the makers, creators and doers working to close tech's gender gap. Sure, the industry has a long way to go, but these women's success shows we're making progress. Essential reading if you're looking at a career in the industry.

International Women’s Day – your inspiration for a career in cybersecurity

Are you thinking about a career in cybersecurity but put off by the lack of women in the industry? There's good news: the tides are changing. What was a male-dominated industry is transforming – slowly but surely. We're celebrating the women who've made it.

The numbers behind tech’s shrinking gender gap

Diversity benefits our teams, yet encouraging more women to join is a constant challenge in the tech industry. Now is the time for change. Kaspersky's Women in Tech report found 57 percent agree there are now more women in IT and tech roles than two years ago. Plus, one in two believe that remote working has improved gender equality. This might seem like slow progress, but it's a positive sign for championing women in cybersecurity. And these trailblazers are leading the way.

Theresa Payton: The first female to serve as White House Chief Information Officer (CIO)

Follow Theresa: @TrackerPayton


How many people can say that? Formerly of the White House, Theresa is CEO of Fortalice – a cybersecurity firm specializing in protecting small-to-medium-sized businesses and a team member on the CBS reality TV show Hunted. Here's her view on what it's like being a woman working in cybersecurity.

Katie Moussouris: The pink-haired, white-hat hacker

Follow Katie: @k8em0

Katie's been programming computers since she was eight. Since then, she's helped Microsoft develop its Bug Bounty program, developed Hack the Pentagon for the US Department of Defence and founded a cybersecurity agency, Luta Security. So what's the secret behind her success?

Eva Galperin: The Outrage Fairy defending digital privacy

Follow Eva: @evacide

Eva set up the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a collection of technologists and activists to defend free speech online and fight illegal surveillance. Now she's a leading voice in the fight against stalkerware. Meet Eva in Tomorrow Unlocked series Defenders of Digital.

Dr. Magda Chelley: The award-winning cyber entrepreneur

Follow Magda: @m49D4ch3lly

Magda is a top international cybersecurity influencer. Global leader of the year at the Women in IT Awards 2017, Founder of Woman in Cyber group, and works with numerous non-profit focus groups. If that wasn't enough, she leads her own company, Responsible Cyber. But what makes her tick?

Shira Rubinoff: Not-your-average cybersecurity influencer

Follow Shira: @Shirastweet

Cybersecurity expert, influencer and font of cyber knowledge – Shira Rubinoff is President of SecureMySocial. Here she breaks down the importance of cybersecurity training.

Tyler Cohen Wood: 20 years’ fighting cyberthreats for the US government

Follow Tyler: @TylerCohenWood

Tyler is a globally-recognized cyber-authority. She's spent time developing cybersecurity initiatives for the White House, Department of Defence and the Defense Intelligence Agency (as their Cyber Deputy Chief.) Here she talks about the cyber-apocalypse.

Jane Frankland: Cyber entrepreneur and best-selling author

Follow Jane: @JaneFrankland

Security entrepreneur and author of In Security: Why a Failure to Attract and Retain Women in Cybersecurity is Making Us All Less Safe – Jane Frankland is empowering more women to become cybersecurity leaders in company boardrooms worldwide. Here she talks about Industry 4.0.

Dr. Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE: Training girls for jobs in cyber

Follow Anne-Marie: @aimafidon


Tech speaker and author, Anne-Marie, CEO of training organization Stemettes, is leading the wave by encouraging girls and young women to pursue cyber careers. Read an interview with Anne-Marie in Secure Futures by Kaspersky magazine.

This is just a tiny snapshot of the incredible women helping to close tech's gender gap globally. Here are a few more women to get on your radar.

Lesley Carhart: Principal Threat Analyst at Dragos, with two decades of threat hunting experience. She was named "Top Woman in Cybersecurity" in 2017.

Follow Lesley: @hacks4pancakes

Noushin Shabab: Senior Security Researcher at Kaspersky who's helping to connect, support and inspire women in security across Australia through the Australian Women in Security Network.

Follow Noushin: @NoushinShbb

Parisa Tabriz: The self-styled "Security Princess" running Google's security testing labs.

Follow Parisa: @laparisa

And not forgetting…

Rebecca Base: 'A maverick and a catalyst for women in cybersecurity,' widely respected as a security technology pioneer, known for her valued role as a mentor to young people and young companies in cyber. Rebecca is no longer with us, but her legacy remains.

Looking for more inspiration on how women are overcoming gender biases in tech and cybersecurity? Explore Kaspersky's Empower Women project.

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Into the hackers’ trap: Where Olympic Destroyer really came from

The final instalment of our series hacker:HUNTER Olympic Destroyer examines how Pyeongchang winter Olympics hackers put smokescreen to misdirect cybersecurity analysts. But through the fog, analysts realized the culprit wasn't who you might expect.

“Like placing someone else’s fingerprints at the crime scene.”

If successful, the 2018 Pyeongchang cyberattack could have cost billions of dollars, leaving a canceled Olympics and a geopolitical disaster in its wake. Their deceptive methods meant the cybercriminals nearly got away with it. Why did they want to point the analysts at another group? And who was behind it all?

Threat attribution – what is it?

Cybercriminals don't leave a calling card, but they do leave evidence. The art of finding and using that evidence to find the culprit is known as threat attribution.

Threat attribution is forensic analysis for advanced persistent threats (APTs). It analyzes the attackers' 'fingerprints,' such as the style of their code, where they attack and what kinds of organizations they target. Attacks can be matched with the fingerprints of other attacks attributed to specific groups.

Cybercriminals carry special ‘fingerprints’

Hackers have their own set of tactics, techniques and procedures. Cybersecurity experts can identify threat actors by studying these elements.

In February 2016, hackers attempted to steal $851 million US dollars and siphoned $81 million US dollars from the Central Bank of Bangladesh. The attack was linked to notorious cyber espionage and sabotage group Lazarus Group. Lazarus attacks casinos, financial institutions, and investment and cryptocurrency software developers.

Lazarus has certain targets and ways of attacking: Infecting a website employees of a targeted organization often visit or finding a vulnerability in one of their servers. These are the 'fingerprints' used in threat attribution.

Finding a needle within in a needle in a haystack

Crucially, Lazarus Group is long thought to be linked to North Korea. Olympic Destroyer included a piece of Lazarus's malware code, but the type of attack didn't fit. Its fingerprints better matched a cluster of attacks by another group with a very different agenda.

Watch the full video to see if you knew who the hacker was all along.

This APT might not have worked, but over the years, others have. To see what a successful APT looks like, watch Chasing Lazarus: A hunt for the infamous hackers to prevent big bank heists.

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COVID fake news and false hope

COVID fake news and false hope

COVID fake news and false hope

"Cybercriminals were quick to realize many years ago that people fall prey to hot topics," says Costin Raiu, Director of Global Research & Analysis, Kaspersky. And today's hottest topic is the pandemic.

Chapter 2 of hacker:HUNTER ha(ck)c1ne explores COVID-related phishing attacks, known as spear-phishing. These attacks skyrocketed by nearly seven times between February and March this year.

When the virus took force, and we were all frantic trying to help each other, cybercriminals found a way to wreak havoc. In September, Facebook announced an aid program of $100 million for small business owners affected by the pandemic. When the story was picked up by the media, hackers started fishing (or, more accurately, phishing) with the bait.

Hack the news

Cybercriminals published fake news saying Facebook would be handing out free money to everyone affected by COVID-19. On a site cleverly disguised to look like Facebook, you fill out a form that shares personal data like your address, social security number or a photo of your ID. You get a confirmation message that your application has been accepted and sit back and wait for the money to arrive. It never will.

The worst part? It's not the false hope, but what cybercriminals can do with this information: tricking friends and family members into sending money, credit card fraud or even identity theft

.

You've got mail

It's not just people like us who criminals are targeting - organizations are hit too. At work, you get sent an email you think is from someone you know or your manager. But when you click on a link or open an attachment, it downloads malicious software opening the door for hackers to access the corporate network. They download data to sell on the dark web, or encrypt it via ransomware and force the business to pay the ransom to stop it from being leaked.

Keep it safe

Photo by Adam Nieścioruk on Unsplash

Criminals have the resources to hit everyone, from society's most vulnerable people to lucrative targets like big businesses and government. "Clearly the world is not as safe as we would like it to be. We're surrounded by all kinds of new and different threats," explains Zak Doffman, Founder and CEO of Digital Barriers. "The access to COVID treatments is a nation-state wide competitive advantage."

In the face of this influx of threats, more kudos to the people keeping us and our data safe, like the Cyber Volunteers 19. To keep yourself safe, Kaspersky Daily serves up advice on spotting and protecting yourself from the Facebook grants scam.

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Unravelling the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympic cyberattack mystery

Unravelling the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympic cyberattack mystery

Unravelling the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympic cyberattack mystery

Looking forward to watching the Olympic Games in Tokyo? Here's a reminder of what happened at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang

Barely noticed by the public, but an elaborate hacking attack hit the stadium, starting a cyber-political puzzle.

A cyber winter

It is February 9, 2018. The stage is set for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics' opening ceremony. But the organizers didn't realize one of the most deceptive cyberattacks in history was afoot.

This three-part series looks at the background to the Pyeongchang cyberattack, the Olympics IT team's stunning response and why it was so hard (and so risky) to find out who did it.

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False flags and confusion bombs: Inside the 2018 Olympics malware

False flags and confusion bombs: Inside the 2018 Olympics malware

False flags and confusion bombs: Inside the 2018 Olympics malware

Security researchers described the code used to attack the 2018 Pyeongchang winter Olympics as 'Frankenstein-like.' In part two of our video series, hacker:HUNTER Olympic Destroyer, they explain how the malware was designed to point in multiple directions.

Who would dare to hack the Olympics?

The designer of an extraordinary piece of code lodged it in a system where it remained undetected for months. Part two of hacker:HUNTER Olympic Destroyer explores the nature of the attack, its process and why 'Frankenstein-like' code made it one of the most mysterious advanced persistent threat (APT) attacks in history.

Olympic Destroyer was the perfect example of an APT. What are they, and why are they so harmful?

APTs attack over time

APTs are sophisticated hacks that often wait for the perfect time to strike to create maximum damage. They lodge themselves in a system and steal critical data over weeks, months or years. Those behind these attacks build complex software for intentional damage – from espionage and sabotage to data theft.

Highly organized groups use APTs

APTs are notoriously associated with highly organized groups. They attack high-status targets like countries or large corporations, notably in manufacturing and finance, aiming to compromise high-value information like intellectual property, military plans and sensitive user data.

Their high-profile targets will have secure networks and defenses, so threats must stay undetected as long as possible. The longer the attack goes on, the more time attackers have to map the system and plan to steal what they want.

Motives behind attacks vary, from harvesting intellectual property to gaining advantage in an industry, to stealing data for use in fraud. One thing is clear: APTs cause severe damage.

The ‘perfect’ APT

Olympic Destroyer was the perfect APT. A highly-organized group attacked a national Olympic committee, and it worked.

The 'confusion bomb' had been undetected in the computer system for four months, biding its time to strike. Being in the system gave them time to find weak spots and pain points to make the attack more devastating. When it finally surfaced, all hell broke loose.

Crippling the whole IT system

By directly attacking the Olympics' data centers in Seoul, South Korea, Olympic Destroyer cut employees' access to network computers. Because Wi-Fi was out, Olympic building security gates stopped working, coverage stopped, and the whole infrastructure went offline. The Pyeongchang IT team was staring down the barrel of a potential geopolitical disaster.

Stay tuned for episode three, where we unravel the IT team's ingenious response and find out who did it. Any guesses? Go to hacker:HUNTER to stay up to speed.

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The people fighting online child exploitation, one image at a time

Meet Susie Hargreaves and her team.

The people fighting online child exploitation, one image at a time

Meet Susie Hargreaves and her team.

The people fighting online child exploitation, one image at a time

Meet Susie Hargreaves and her team.

Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) hunts down child sexual abuse images online and helps identify children involved so that law enforcement can intervene. While the recent pandemic has triggered greater numbers of child abuse images, CEO Susie Hargreaves and her team are fighting back with a new piece of tech.

Defenders of Digital episode one: Internet Watch Foundation 

COVID-19 has fuelled a disturbing increase in child sex abuse material online. Our latest Defenders of Digital series begins by introducing Susie Hargreaves's team at Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) and explores their mission to make children safer. It also looks at how the pandemic has moved the goalposts and the new tech making a difference.

Where it all began 

Formed in 1996 in response to a fast-growing number of online child abuse cases, IWF's 155 members include tech's biggest names, such as Microsoft and Google. They're united by the common goal to rid the internet of child sexual abuse images and videos.

Online child abuse is a growing issue

The pandemic has made the issue of online child sexual abuse material more acute. During lockdown in the UK alone, IWF says 300,000 people were looking at online child sexual abuse images at any one time. What's worse, the material is always changing.

Self-generated content: A dark twist

IWF has recently seen a worrying rise in self-generated sexual abuse material, chiefly among girls age 11 to 13. The victim is groomed or coerced into photographing or filming themselves, which the sexual predator captures and distributes online. In the past year alone, the proportion of online content they're removing that is self-generated has risen from 33 to 40 percent.

New tech making the difference

There are encouraging developments helping IWF with their work. Microsoft's PhotoDNA analyzes known child exploitation images, finds copies elsewhere on the internet, and reports them for removal. It helped IWF remove 132,700 web pages showing child sexual abuse images in 2019. How does it work?

PhotoDNA scours the web for matching images

First, PhotoDNA creates a unique digital fingerprint of a known child abuse image, called a 'hash.' It compares that fingerprint against other hashes across the internet to find copies. It reports copies it finds to the site's host. It's a fast and ingenious way to shut down child exploitation.

Help stop child sexual exploitation: Report abuse images

Internet users who have stumbled across suspected child abuse images and reported them to IWF have been instrumental in starting a process that's led to many children in abusive situations receiving help. If you see an image or video you think may show child sexual exploitation, report it anonymously to IWF.

Want to learn how to better protect your kids when they're online? A free training course, based on the Skill Cup mobile app and developed with Kaspersky, is now available for parents to understand the challenges children face today.

Explore the course to better protect your kids online.

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Money-spitting ATMs - watch the whole story!

Money-spitting ATMs - watch the whole story!

Money-spitting ATMs - watch the whole story!

hacker:HUNTER Cashing In, Episode One

"ATMs hold cash, and that makes them attractive for criminals." The opening statement of this episode sums up what the whole mini-series is about. While criminals around the world try to get to the money in cash-machines with hammers, explosives, excavators or other heavy gear, the Carbanak gang found a more elegant and stealth way. They would hack into bank networks and monitor the activities there until they understood how to trigger the machines remotely to spill out all the money.

Episode 1 explains how security researchers were alerted to it, how they brought international police forces into the investigation and why the method of attacking ATMs is called Jackpotting after a researcher named Barnaby Jack.

More about the series here.

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Welcome to Taiwan!

Welcome to Taiwan!

Welcome to Taiwan!

hacker:HUNTER Cashing In, Episode Two

The Carbanak Group attacks a bank in Taiwan and sends 22 money mules into the country. What they didn't anticipate: within a few hours the Taiwanese police publish surveillance pictures of all the money mules. The hunt begins.

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hacker:HUNTER WannaCRY, Chapter 3

hacker:HUNTER WannaCRY, Chapter 3

hacker:HUNTER WannaCRY, Chapter 3

Stuck in the US, free on bail, Marcus Hutchins considers his options and decides to plead guilty. He faces up to 10 years in jail.

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hacker:HUNTER WannaCry, Chapter 2

hacker:HUNTER WannaCry, Chapter 2

hacker:HUNTER WannaCry, Chapter 2

His random act of heroism makes security researcher Marcus Hutchins famous overnight. Being celebrated by media around the world, he spends a week in Las Vegas. When he wants to leave, the FBI arrests him. They suspect him of creating malware.

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hacker:HUNTER WannaCry - Chapter 1

hacker:HUNTER WannaCry - Chapter 1

hacker:HUNTER WannaCry - Chapter 1

One day in May 2017, computers all around the world suddenly shut down. A malware called WannaCry asks for ransom. The epidemic suddenly stops, because a young, British researcher found a killswitch, by accident.

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Arrest by the sea

Arrest by the sea

Arrest by the sea

The Taiwanese police finds clues to the whereabouts of the head of the Carbanak group and coordinates with Europol. Can the group be stopped?

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